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DC Central Kitchen is America's leader in reducing hunger with recycled food, training unemployed adults for culinary careers, serving healthy school meals, and rebuilding urban food systems through social enterprise.
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Updates for Healthy Corners


From Campus Kitchen to Corner Store: Huan Song and DCCK Bring Good Food Where it’s Needed Most

, August 13th, 2014

Huan Photo 2

Huan Song used to dream of being a professional chef. Today, she aspires to make fresh, nutritious food available in all of DC’s poorest neighborhoods. A love of cooking and her volunteer work with The Campus Kitchens Project linked these two dreams and led her to her current job as nutrition and community coordinator at DC Central Kitchen.

The Campus Kitchens Project feeds a love of cooking

Huan has been involved in nutrition and food issues since she was a teenager. She graduated from the College of William and Mary in 2013 with degrees in environmental science and business administration, but her first love was culinary arts—specifically French cuisine—and she planned to go to culinary school after high school.

“I learned French and everything,” she laughs.

Her parents suggested she spend time working in a restaurant kitchen before enrolling in culinary school. This was sage advice, as it turned out: Huan hated the hectic kitchen environment, but her love of cooking remained intact.

“So I went to college. But there was no kitchen in my dorm and I needed a place to cook. My first week at college, I went to an information session on Campus Kitchens,” she says.

Over one-third of all food in the United States is never eaten—it gets thrown out, usually after it has been harvested, transported, processed, and sold. This waste drives up food prices, uses up resources, and adds to pollution. At the same time, millions of people in the U.S. suffer from hunger and malnutrition. Through The Campus Kitchens Project, student volunteers at 36 schools around the country address the dual problems of waste and hunger by recovering unused food from cafeterias and preparing and delivering nutritious meals for people in need. They also teach kids and families about nutrition, develop partnerships with farms and other institutions to make efficient use of food, and build connections in their schools’ communities.

Huan volunteered for The Campus Kitchens Project throughout her college years. She began gleaning for the program from a farmers’ market in Colonial Williamsburg that she frequented every Saturday, getting to know the farmers and bakers, who were happy to donate their unsold products to the program.

She also joined the Botany Club, worked for food service company Aramark doing market-sustainable procurement for the campus dining service, and interned at an international development organization to learn more about food and development issues.

In the process, she developed a passion not just for food, but for food justice, and that’s what brought her to DC Central Kitchen. As nutrition and community coordinator, Huan works on two DC Central Kitchen programs, Healthy Corners and the Truck Farm, that aim to bring fresh produce to food deserts (parts of the city where such food is scarce or financially out of reach) through an approach that involves and benefits stores, customers, and neighborhoods.

Access to real food in all DC neighborhoods

Cheap eats—highly processed snacks and convenience foods that are high in calories but low in nutritional value—are abundant everywhere, and for many, they offer an inexpensive way to satisfy hunger. But for too many communities, processed snacks are all that is available, because fresh, nutritious food either is not sold where people live or is too expensive for them to buy regularly.

Huan 6Huan believes that affordable, nutritious food should be accessible in every neighborhood in DC, not just the affluent ones. The lack of nutritious food in low-income areas contributes to poor health and can make it hard for kids to succeed at school (and adults at work), adding to the many challenges they already face. She and her colleagues at DC Central Kitchen are working with communities and businesses to increase the availability of nutritious and affordable food in DC’s food deserts.

“We want to provide people with access to nutritious food,” she says.

Healthy Corners finds convenience stores in low-income neighborhoods that are located in high-traffic areas without a nearby grocery store, places where fresh produce is not available. Healthy Corners works with shop owners who are interested in participating in the program to make fruit, vegetables, and other nutritious foods and snacks available in their stores.

Normally, the cost of procuring a small amount of perishable produce would be too high for a small corner store in a low-income area, but Healthy Corners buys it in bulk for all 36 participating stores, and store owners order only what they need from DC Central Kitchen.

The program works with the store owners to look at what they sell, who their customers are, and what their customers want to buy. It then helps the stores market the products through attractive branded displays and periodic cooking demonstrations on the stores’ high-traffic days.

Healthy Corners breaks down barriers

Even city residents who are lucky enough to have access to affordable vegetables and fruits may never have had a chance to see how they grow. To give them a glimpse, Truck Farm brings rows of herbs, lettuces, strawberries, and other garden vegetables to them—in the back of a pickup truck.

Since 2011, the travelling garden has been going to city events, Healthy Corners cooking demonstrations, and to schools, where kids can see how a tomato plant or a head of lettuce grows. Cooking demonstrations feature some of the vegetables that are growing in the truck, so people can see the link between a garden and a meal.

Kids play an important role in making Healthy Corners work. Through DCCK’s Healthy School Food program, kids learn about the benefits of fresh food and are given a voice in how to eat it: At cooking demonstrations in schools, students sample a given ingredient—say, kale—in three different recipes. They vote on the best-tasting recipe, and that dish is later featured in the school cafeteria. Huan says that, given the chance to pick their favorite dish, the kids are often more open-minded about new foods than their parents. To make it as easy as possible to include new dishes in their families’ diets, the program gives the students recipe cards and a list of nearby stores that participate in Healthy Corners where they can buy the ingredients.

The Healthy Corners model is succeeding because it aligns its goals with those of the store owners and customers. The stores want to attract customers, and one way to do that is to show they care by offering healthful food.

“The shop owners are happy to take ownership of the program and promote it, because customers like it,” says Huan.

It also increases their chances of winning DC government “Great Streets” capital improvement grants to improve storefront facades or upgrade equipment. More attractive stores and happier customers are good for business and the neighborhood.

DC Central Kitchen has received a second grant from DC’s Department of Small and Local Business Development to expand Healthy Corners to 30 more stores this summer. Huan hopes the program will “take down barriers”—she means both the plexiglass windows that are all too common in stores as well as the barriers to food security that low-income communities face.

She sees it as part of the larger food movement advocating healthy, sustainable food systems that benefit everyone.

“The food movement is a long process, like the women’s movement and civil rights movements. We’re at the beginning of that process,” she says. “I want Healthy Corners to be a household name; I want fresh fruit and vegetables to be as available as Coca Cola.”



Home Cooking vs. Hunger Week: Let’s Talk Live Videos

, June 20th, 2014

Check out our staff on Let’s Talk Live this week, featuring our efforts to fight hunger and promote healthy eating. We’re excited to be part of this Home Cooking vs. Hunger Week. A huge thanks to Walmart and NewsChannel 8 for promoting our work.



Truck Farm Season Starts

, June 12th, 2014
Truck Farm

DCCK’s Truck Farm at Thomas Elementary with Huan Song leading a lesson.

This month marks the roll out of DC Central Kitchen’s Truck Farm, and we’re excited to be delivering our nutrition education lessons to children around the city to teach them about healthy eating and where their food comes from.

Truck Farm is exactly what it sounds like—a pick-up truck with a garden planted in its bed. Our partnership with the USDA, the United States Department of Agriculture, allows us to take the farm to the ten schools where we serve healthy school lunches in wards 5, 7, and 8. The whole idea is that kids can see, touch, and learn about healthy food in an interesting and dynamic way that will make an impact because it’s fun and different.

“Let’s go around and say our name, favorite fruit, and favorite vegetable. What’s yours?” asked Huan Song, DCCK’s Nutrition and Outreach Coordinator turning to one of the seven years olds gathered around the truck farm, parked at Thomas Elementary School in Deanwood, located in D.C.’s Ward 7.

The Truck Farm inspires the kids to come up with creative places to investigate nature, whether by growing a small plant on their window sills or even in an old can. After checking out the Truck Farm, Thomas Elementary students planted their own arugula seeds in plastic cups to start their own urban gardens.

“I’m really excited about Truck Farm’s fourth growing season,” says Huan. Like previous years, the Truck Farm educators will bring our mobile classroom to community health events, schools, and summer care programs in order to connect children with the process of growing food. In addition to our focus on nutrition education through hands on learning, the curriculum this year will also expand to integrate language arts education through our partnership with the DC Public Library.

The Truck Farm program continues to partner with DC Central Kitchen’s Healthy School Food and Healthy Corners Programs in order to reinforce our organization’s multifaceted approach to nutrition education and community empowerment. We’re excited to see where it goes next! Follow @dcck on Twitter for the latest updates.



Healthy Corners Doubling Number of Stores This Summer

, May 30th, 2014
Healthy Corners

DCCK has partnered with Zenful Bites to conduct outreach events at each new store opening.

The DC Department of Small and Local Business Development (DSLBD) is providing DC Central Kitchen with a $250,000 grant to double the number of stores participating in Healthy Corners. Healthy Corners is the first program of its kind aimed at combating food deserts and making healthier food more available in DC’s low income communities. Since 2011, DC Central Kitchen has partnered with 33 corner stores to provide fresh produce and healthy snacks at the stores, which are often the closest affordable grocery option. With the DSLBD grant, DC Central Kitchen will expand the program to 63 stores this summer.

The grant will help DC Central Kitchen continue its important work of providing the District’s underserved communities with healthy food. DC Central Kitchen has been instrumental in leveraging their resources to provide valuable services to vulnerable populations, and we are very grateful for their work. - Robert Summers, Director of the Department of Small and Local Business Development.

The agency’s partnership with DC Central Kitchen began two years ago when they funded the initial rollout of the program through a six-month pilot period. The program has since worked with many partners, including DC Department of Health, CoBANK, Kaiser Permanente, Aetna, NBC Universal, Tavis Smiley-UMD, Wallace Genetic Foundation and the McGuinn Family Foundation. By providing strategic marketing support and heavily discounted product, Healthy Corners has brought DC’s corner stores into the healthy food business. In 2013, the participating stores grossed over $40,000 in sales and sold over 7,500 nutritious snacks.

Today represents a proven approach to public-private partnerships in D.C. Thanks to the Department of Small and Local Business Development, we now have the resources to expand into new neighborhoods, making healthy food more affordable and accessible to District residents. – Michael F. Curtin, Jr., CEO, DC Central Kitchen

Visit our Healthy Corners page for more information about the program.



Healthy Corners Opens New Store, Partners with Zenful Bites

, May 8th, 2014
Healthy Corners opens 35th Store

From the left: Jin Oh (Owner of Northeast Supermarket), Josephine Chu (Zenful Bites), Huan Song (DC Central Kitchen)

Healthy Corners is growing! We recently welcomed Northeast Supermarket on Mt. Olivet Road, NE as our 35th Healthy Corners store.

Jin Oh, the owner of Northeast Supermarket, says that she was interested in joining Healthy Corners for three reasons: convenience, good fresh products and good prices.

I want to be able to make sure that my customers have access to fruits and vegetables here in the neighborhood. I feel like everyone likes fresh foods and we need to have them here in our store. Your program makes that easy to do.
- Jin Oh

To introduce shoppers to the Healthy Corners program and products, our partners at Zenful Bites hosted an on-site cooking demonstration, serving up a broccoli, pepper and onion stir fry, handing out samples in the parking lot.

The stir fry was a crowd pleaser and customers were happy to learn that they could now find fresh ingredients like those used along with recipes for using them in their neighborhood store.
One enthusiastic customer helped draw reluctant friends and neighbors over to the demonstration, saying, “Come here and try this if you want to learn about eating the type of food that will help you stay healthy and watch your weight,” as she helped pass out samples.

This summer we will continue to open new stores each week. Stay tuned with the latest on Healthy Corners!



Healthy Corners Info for Consumers

, April 29th, 2014

What is Healthy Corners?
Healthy Corners is DC Central Kitchen’s program to provide fresh fruits and vegetables and other healthy snacks to corner stores near you.

We provide staples for healthy snacking and cooking, including: apples, bananas, grapes, greens, lemons, lettuce, onions, oranges, potatoes, squash, sweet potatoes, peppers, tomatoes, trail mix, and more.

The average price of a Healthy Corners food item is .55 cents! This can be significantly cheaper than what you’d find at a conventional supermarket. Healthy Corners makes eating healthy convenient and affordable.

General Information
Info for Corner Store Owners

Store Locations
Check out this map for the nearest Healthy Corners store location.

Healthy Corners Products
Check out these delicious fresh products for sale in participating stores. More to come!

cucumbersgreen applesgreen pepperslemonslimesorangespotatoesred applesred grapefruitred onionsred peppersspinachsweet potatoestomatoesyellow onionsbrown riceapple a day bagstrail mixcut fruit